The Best Etfs For Investing In Emerging Markets

As investors, we're always on the lookout for the next big opportunity to grow our portfolios. And in today's global economy, emerging markets are where the action is. These markets are home to some of the fastest-growing economies in the world, and they offer the potential for high returns. But with so many options out there, it can be overwhelming to know where to start. That's why we've done the research for you and compiled a list of the best ETFs for investing in emerging markets. Whether you're a seasoned investor or just starting out, these funds are sure to help you tap into the exciting potential of these markets and grow your wealth.

Key Takeaways (a short summary)

  • Index funds are a great option for beginner investors who want to minimize risk exposure, with benefits such as instant diversification, low cost, reduced risk, and easy accessibility.
  • Investing in emerging markets can offer high returns and diversification, but requires proper analysis and research to reduce risks. Risks include political instability, economic risks, volatile currency, and lax insider trading restrictions.
  • Investing in ETFs for emerging markets can provide investors with potential high returns, diversification and risk management, lower costs, tax benefits, and access to global investment expertise. Tips for choosing the best ETFs include identifying the right index, considering the underlying index or asset class, checking the expense ratio, and considering the fund's performance and liquidity.
  • Diversification is key to managing risk when investing in ETFs for emerging markets. This includes investing in different regions, sectors, company sizes, and alternative investments to spread risk and potentially increase returns.
  • Investors should review and adjust their investments in index funds periodically to ensure alignment with investment goals and risk tolerance. It is also important to understand the tax implications of investing in ETFs for emerging markets, as they may be less tax efficient and subject to foreign withholding taxes.

The rest of this article will explain specific topics. You may read them in any order, as they are meant to be complete but concise.

Understanding Index Funds

What are Index Funds?

Index funds are a type of mutual fund that aims to replicate the performance of a financial market index, such as the S&P 500 or the Dow Jones Industrial Average. Rather than trying to actively beat a benchmark, an index fund aims to be the benchmark, which is called passive management.

This means that the fund manager does not try to pick individual stocks to outperform the market but instead invests in all the companies that make up the index, in the same proportion as the index.

How do Index Funds Work?

When you buy shares in an index fund, you are pooling your money with other investors. The pool of money is used to buy shares in all the companies that make up the particular index. The fund manager regularly adjusts the share of the assets in the fund's portfolio to match the makeup of the index.

By doing so, the return on the fund should match the performance of the target index, before accounting for fund expenses.

What are the Benefits of Index Funds?

1. Diversification: Index funds offer instant diversification by spreading your bet across a wide pool of investment opportunities. By investing in all the companies that make up the index, you are spreading your risk across different sectors and industries.

2. Low Cost: Index funds have lower fees than actively managed funds because there is no active manager to pay. This means that you get to keep more of your returns.

3. Reduced Risk: Because the goal of index funds is to mirror the same holdings of whatever index they track, they are naturally diversified and thus hold a lower risk than individual stock holdings. This makes them a great option for beginner investors who want to minimize their risk exposure.

4. Easy to Invest: Index funds can be bought through your 401(k) or individual retirement account (IRA), or also via an online brokerage account. This means that you can easily invest in index funds without needing to have a lot of investment knowledge or experience.

5. Socially Responsible Investing: Socially responsible investing index funds are also available, which look to promote causes like protecting the environment or improving workplace diversity. This means that you can invest in companies that align with your values and beliefs.

Exploring Emerging Markets

Advantages of Investing in Emerging Markets

  • Potential for High Returns: Emerging markets offer some of the best long-term growth opportunities. As these economies grow and develop, their companies have the potential to generate high returns for investors.
  • Diversification: Investing in emerging markets can help diversify your portfolio and reduce risk. Because emerging markets are not closely correlated with developed markets, they can offer a hedge against market volatility.
  • Exposure to Fast-Growing Economies: Many companies in developing markets are relatively inexpensive compared to their developed market peers. By investing in emerging markets, you have the opportunity to gain exposure to fast-growing economies and companies poised for growth.
  • Complement to a Diversified Portfolio: Emerging market equities offer unique risks and opportunities that may complement a diversified portfolio. By investing in emerging markets, you can add a new dimension to your portfolio and potentially enhance returns.

Disadvantages of Investing in Emerging Markets

  • Higher Risk: Investing in emerging markets is typically considered riskier than investing in developed markets due to political and economic uncertainties of foreign countries as well as the risk of currency fluctuations. It's important to do proper analysis and research to reduce risks.
  • Volatility: Emerging markets have more layers of risk than domestic stocks or foreign developed stocks, and they have been more volatile than developed markets. This volatility can be challenging for investors who are not comfortable with risk.

Investing in Emerging Markets: Final Thoughts

While investing in emerging markets can offer unique advantages, please do your due diligence and research before making any investment decisions. Emerging markets require proper analysis and research to reduce risks.

However, they can be a smart addition to a long-term investment portfolio, as they offer exposure to where most of the world's economic growth is coming from over the next couple of decades.

Additionally, emerging markets are a standard part of many long-term, diversified stock and bond portfolios, especially those made up of low-cost index funds.

By investing in index funds that track emerging market indexes, you can gain exposure to a diversified basket of emerging market equities and potentially enhance returns while reducing risk.

The Advantages of ETFs for Emerging Markets

If you're looking to invest in emerging markets, exchange-traded funds (ETFs) are a great way to gain exposure to these markets. Here are some of the benefits of investing in ETFs for emerging markets:

Potential for High Returns

Emerging markets have the potential to generate higher returns than developed markets. This is because emerging markets are growing at a faster pace than developed markets. As a result, investing in ETFs that track emerging markets can provide investors with the potential for high returns.

Diversification and Risk Management

ETFs provide portfolio diversification and risk management by investing in a basket of securities that track an underlying index. This can help reduce the risk of investing in a single stock or sector.

By investing in a diversified portfolio of securities, investors can reduce the impact of any one security on their overall portfolio.

Lower Costs

ETFs generally have lower expense ratios than actively managed funds. This can help investors keep more of their returns. With lower fees, ETFs are an attractive option for investors who are looking to minimize their costs.

Tax Benefits

ETFs are generally more tax-efficient than mutual funds because they have lower turnover and fewer capital gains distributions. This means that investors can keep more of their returns and pay less in taxes.

Access to Global Investment Expertise

Investing in ETFs for emerging markets can provide access to the global investment expertise and capital markets resources of asset managers like J.P. Morgan. This can help investors make informed investment decisions and take advantage of opportunities in emerging markets.

Opportunities for Active Management

Emerging markets equities are traditionally an asset class where active management can add value. By investing in ETFs that are actively managed, investors can take advantage of the expertise of fund managers who specialize in emerging markets.

Overall, investing in ETFs for emerging markets can provide investors with the potential for high returns, diversification and risk management, lower costs, tax benefits, and access to global investment expertise.

If you're looking to invest in emerging markets, ETFs are a smart choice.

Understanding the Downsides of Investing in Emerging Markets

Investing in emerging markets can be a great way to diversify your portfolio and potentially earn high returns. However, please understand the risks involved before jumping in. Here are some of the risks you should be aware of:

Political Risk

Emerging markets often have unstable governments, which can lead to political unrest and economic instability. Investors may face serious consequences if a government undergoes a change in policy or is overthrown.

Economic Risk

Emerging markets can suffer from insufficient labor and raw materials, high inflation or deflation, unregulated markets, and unsound monetary policies. These factors can present challenges to investors, especially if they are not familiar with the local economy.

Currency Risk

The value of emerging market currencies can be volatile, which can impact the returns of investors who invest in these markets. Currency fluctuations can lead to significant losses or gains, depending on the direction of the market.

Foreign Exchange Rate Risk

Emerging markets can be subject to fluctuations in foreign exchange rates, which can impact the returns of investors who invest in these markets. This risk is particularly relevant for investors who invest in index funds that track emerging market currencies.

Non-Normal Distributions

Emerging markets may have non-normal distributions, which can make it difficult to predict future returns. This is because the market may be affected by events that are not normally distributed, such as political unrest or natural disasters.

Lax Insider Trading Restrictions

Emerging markets may have lax insider trading restrictions, which can make it easier for insiders to profit at the expense of outside investors. This can lead to a lack of transparency and accountability in the market.

Lack of Liquidity

Emerging markets may have less liquidity than developed markets, which can make it difficult to buy and sell securities. This can lead to higher transaction costs and longer wait times for investors.

Difficulty Raising Capital

Companies in emerging markets may have difficulty raising capital, which can limit their growth potential. This can lead to lower returns for investors who invest in these companies.

Poor Corporate Governance

Emerging markets may have weaker corporate governance standards than developed markets, which can make it more difficult for investors to hold companies accountable. This can lead to a lack of transparency and accountability in the market.

Choosing the Best ETFs for Emerging Markets

Investing in emerging markets can be a great way to diversify your portfolio and potentially earn higher returns. One popular way to invest in these markets is through exchange-traded funds (ETFs) that track broad market indices.

However, with so many ETFs available, it can be difficult to know which ones are the best for your investment goals.

Here are some tips on how to choose the best ETFs for investing in emerging markets:

Identify the right index

The first step in choosing an ETF is to identify the right index to track. Some popular indices for emerging markets include the MSCI Emerging Markets Index and the FTSE Emerging Index. Once you've found the right index, make sure the fund is reasonably priced, well-run, and tradable.

Look for ETFs with low fees and a good track record of performance.

Consider the underlying index or asset class

When selecting an ETF, consider the underlying index or asset class on which the ETF is based. From the point of view of diversification, it may be preferable to invest in an ETF that tracks a broad market index.

This can help reduce your exposure to any one country or sector.

Look at the fund's top holdings

When selecting an international ETF, pay attention to the fund's top holdings, along with investment distributions across sectors and regions. The key is to align your investments with your desired asset allocation without being overexposed to one area of the market.

Look for ETFs with a good mix of holdings across different countries and sectors.

Check the expense ratio

The expense ratio is the annual fee that the ETF charges to cover its operating expenses. The total expense ratio (TER) of ETFs on these indices is between 0.14% p.a and 0.65% p.a Look for ETFs with low expense ratios, as these can eat into your returns over time.

Consider the competition among similar ETFs

The ETF market has become intensely competitive. This has generally been positive for investors, as it has driven the fees associated with ETFs down toward zero, making them extremely low-cost and efficient securities.

Consider the competition among similar ETFs and look for ones with low fees and good track records.

Look for ETFs that fit your preferences

Select an ETF that fits your preferences best. For example, if you're looking for an ETF with exposure to a specific country or sector, look for one that specializes in that area. If you're looking for an ETF with a particular investment style, such as value or growth, look for one that aligns with your preferences.

Check the fund's performance

Look at the fund's historical performance and compare it to its benchmark index. Look for ETFs with a good track record of performance over time. However, keep in mind that past performance is not a guarantee of future results.

Consider the fund's liquidity

Make sure the ETF is liquid enough to trade without difficulty. Look for ETFs with high trading volumes and narrow bid-ask spreads. This can help ensure that you can buy and sell the ETF at a fair price.

Top-Performing ETFs for Emerging Markets

When it comes to investing in emerging markets, it can be difficult to know where to start. With so many options available, it can be overwhelming to choose the right ETFs for your portfolio. To help you out, we've compiled a list of the top-performing ETFs for emerging markets.

iShares MSCI Emerging Markets Min Vol Factor ETF (EEMV)

The iShares MSCI Emerging Markets Min Vol Factor ETF (EEMV) is a great option for investors looking for a low-volatility investment. This ETF tracks the MSCI Emerging Markets Minimum Volatility Index, which includes companies in emerging markets that have historically exhibited lower volatility.

This ETF has a low expense ratio of 0.25% and has performed well over the past year.

Vanguard Emerging Markets ETF (VWO)

The Vanguard Emerging Markets ETF (VWO) is another popular option for investors looking to invest in emerging markets. This ETF tracks the FTSE Emerging Markets All Cap China A Inclusion Index and includes companies in emerging markets around the world.

With an expense ratio of just 0.10%, this ETF is one of the most affordable options available.

iShares Core MSCI Emerging Markets ETF (IEMG)

The iShares Core MSCI Emerging Markets ETF (IEMG) is a great option for investors looking for a diversified investment in emerging markets. This ETF tracks the MSCI Emerging Markets Investable Market Index and includes companies in emerging markets around the world.

With an expense ratio of just 0.13%, this ETF is a low-cost option for investors.

iShares India 50 ETF (INDY)

The iShares India 50 ETF (INDY) is a great option for investors looking to invest specifically in India. This ETF tracks the Nifty 50 Index, which includes the 50 largest companies in India. With an expense ratio of just 0.92%, this ETF is a relatively low-cost option for investors looking to invest in India.

Global X MSCI China Energy (CHIE)

The Global X MSCI China Energy (CHIE) ETF is a great option for investors looking to invest in the energy sector in China. This ETF tracks the MSCI China Energy Index and includes companies in the energy sector in China.

With an expense ratio of just 0.65%, this ETF is a relatively low-cost option for investors looking to invest in the energy sector in China.

KraneShares S&P Pan Asia Consumer Staples ETF (CWEB)

The KraneShares S&P Pan Asia Consumer Staples ETF (CWEB) is a great option for investors looking to invest in the consumer staples sector in Asia. This ETF tracks the S&P Pan Asia Consumer Staples Index and includes companies in the consumer staples sector in Asia.

With an expense ratio of just 0.60%, this ETF is a relatively low-cost option for investors looking to invest in the consumer staples sector in Asia.

Columbia EM Core ex-China ETF

The Columbia EM Core ex-China ETF is a great option for investors looking to invest in emerging markets, excluding China. This ETF tracks the Beta Advantage Emerging Markets ex-China Index and includes companies in emerging markets around the world, excluding China.

With an expense ratio of just 0.25%, this ETF is a relatively low-cost option for investors looking to invest in emerging markets, excluding China.

iShares MSCI Emerging Markets ex China ETF

The iShares MSCI Emerging Markets ex China ETF is a great option for investors looking to invest in emerging markets, excluding China. This ETF tracks the MSCI Emerging Markets ex China Index and includes companies in emerging markets around the world, excluding China.

With an expense ratio of just 0.25%, this ETF is a relatively low-cost option for investors looking to invest in emerging markets, excluding China.

JHancock Multifactor Em Mkts ETF

The JHancock Multifactor Em Mkts ETF is a great option for investors looking for a multifactor approach to investing in emerging markets. This ETF tracks the John Hancock Multifactor Emerging Markets Index and includes companies in emerging markets around the world.

With an expense ratio of just 0.49%, this ETF is a relatively low-cost option for investors looking for a multifactor approach to investing in emerging markets.

Diversifying Your Portfolio

1. Consider Investing in Emerging Market ETFs

ETFs, or exchange-traded funds, are a type of investment that allows you to buy and sell a basket of stocks or other assets in a single transaction. This can be a great way to gain exposure to emerging markets while minimizing risk.

Some popular emerging market ETFs include the iShares MSCI Emerging Markets ETF, the Vanguard FTSE Emerging Markets ETF, and the SPDR S&P Emerging Markets ETF.

2. Invest in Mutual Funds

Mutual funds are another way to gain exposure to emerging markets while diversifying your portfolio. These funds pool money from multiple investors and use it to buy a variety of assets, such as stocks, bonds, and other securities.

Some examples of mutual funds that invest in emerging markets include the Mackenzie Maximum Diversification Emerging Markets Index Fund and the diversified emerging market funds from Morningstar.

3. Diversify by Geography

One of the key ways to diversify your portfolio is by investing in different regions of the world. This can help you spread your risk across different markets and potentially increase your returns. Emerging markets in Asia-Pacific include China, Taiwan, South Korea, and India.

Other regions to consider investing in include the United States, Europe, and Latin America.

4. Diversify by Sector

Another way to diversify your portfolio is by investing in different sectors of the economy. This can help you spread your risk across different industries and potentially increase your returns. Some sectors to consider investing in include IT, industrials, and consumer discretionary.

  • IT: This sector includes companies that develop and distribute technology products and services, such as software, hardware, and telecommunications equipment.
  • Industrials: This sector includes companies that produce and distribute industrial goods and services, such as machinery, transportation equipment, and construction materials.
  • Consumer Discretionary: This sector includes companies that produce and distribute non-essential consumer goods and services, such as apparel, entertainment, and travel.
5. Diversify by Company Size

Another way to diversify your portfolio is by investing in companies of different sizes. This can help you spread your risk across different types of companies and potentially increase your returns.

Some types of companies to consider investing in include:

  • Large Cap: These are typically large, well-established companies with a market capitalization of over $10 billion.
  • Mid Cap: These are medium-sized companies with a market capitalization of between $2 billion and $10 billion.
  • Small Cap: These are small, up-and-coming companies with a market capitalization of under $2 billion.
6. Consider Alternative Investments

Increasingly, financial experts are recommending an allocation to alternative investments when diversifying a stock portfolio. These may include investments in global real estate, infrastructure, hedge funds, private equity, and commodities such as timber and agriculture.

These types of investments can provide diversification benefits and potentially increase returns, but they also come with their own risks and drawbacks.

Tax Implications of ETFs for Emerging Markets

Investing in ETFs for emerging markets can be a great way to diversify your portfolio and potentially earn higher returns. However, please understand the tax implications that come with investing in these funds.

ETFs versus Mutual Funds

First, please note that ETFs are generally more tax-efficient than traditional mutual funds. This means that holding an ETF in a taxable account will generate fewer tax liabilities than holding a similarly structured mutual fund in the same account.

Capital Gains and Dividend Taxes

ETFs and mutual funds are subject to capital gains tax and taxation of dividend income, and the tax treatment of ETFs and mutual funds is the same from the perspective of the IRS. This means that any capital gains or dividends earned from an ETF will be subject to taxation.

In-Kind Transactions

One advantage of ETFs is that they create and redeem shares with in-kind transactions that are not considered sales, which means they do not create taxable events. However, when an ETF is sold, the trade triggers a taxable event.

Long-Term versus Short-Term Capital Gains

ETFs held for more than a year are taxed at the long-term capital gains rates, which goes up to 20%. Individuals with substantial income from investing may also pay an additional 3.8% Net Investment Income Tax (NIIT).

ETFs held for less than a year are taxed at ordinary income rates, with the top end of that range at 37%, plus an additional 3.8% NIIT for some investors.

Emerging Market ETFs

Certain international ETFs, particularly emerging market ETFs, have the potential to be less tax efficient than domestic and developed market ETFs. Unlike most other ETFs, many emerging markets are restricted from performing in-kind deliveries of securities.

Therefore, an emerging-market ETF might have to sell securities to meet redemptions, which can trigger capital gains taxes.

Foreign Withholding Taxes

Emerging markets equity ETFs may also be subject to foreign withholding taxes, which can reduce returns for investors. In some account types, level II withholding taxes are incurred when the emerging markets stocks are held indirectly via a US-listed ETF.

Vanguard Emerging Market Index Fund

The Vanguard Emerging Market Index Fund is a suitable candidate for placement in taxable accounts. This index fund tracks the FTSE Emerging Index and has historically been tax-efficient.

Reviewing and Adjusting Your Investments

Investing in index funds is a great way to diversify your portfolio and reduce risk. However, it's essential to review and adjust your investments periodically to ensure that they are aligned with your investment goals and risk tolerance.

Here are some insights to help you review and adjust your investments in index funds.

Review Frequency

The frequency of review and adjustment of your investments in index funds depends on your investment goals, risk tolerance, and market conditions. However, it is generally recommended to review your investments at least once a year.

This will help you to stay on track with your investment goals and make any necessary adjustments to your portfolio.

ETF Selection

When selecting index funds, it's essential to consider those that measure the performance of the large- and mid-cap segments of the selected equity markets. These indexes are designed to cover about 85% of the equity universe in each of the markets included in the study.

This will help you to achieve broad diversification and reduce the risk of concentration in any one sector or company.

ETF Performance

To compare the performance of different index funds, you can use online tools that allow you to compare side-by-side across multiple time-frames, technicals, and financials. This will help you to identify the best performing index funds and make informed decisions about your investments.

ETF Options

There are several index fund options for investing in emerging markets, including the iShares MSCI Emerging Markets ETF (EEM), the iShares Emerging Markets Equity Factor ETF (EMGF), and the Global X Emerging Markets ETF (EMM).

Each of these index funds has its own unique characteristics and risk profile, so it's essential to do your research and select the one that is best suited to your investment goals and risk tolerance.

Active versus Passive Management

Most index funds for emerging markets are passively managed, which means that they track the performance of a specific index. Actively managed index funds are rare, but they do exist. Please understand the difference between active and passive management and select the one that is best suited to your investment goals and risk tolerance.

Common Mistakes to Avoid When Investing in ETFs for Emerging Markets

Investing in ETFs for emerging markets can be a smart way to diversify your portfolio and potentially earn higher returns. However, there are several common mistakes that investors make that can hurt their returns.

Here are the top 10 mistakes to avoid when investing in ETFs for emerging markets:

1. Not being properly diversified - Diversification is key to managing risk in any investment portfolio, and this is especially true for emerging market ETFs. Investing in a variety of countries and industries can help spread out risk and protect your investments from market volatility.

2. Ignoring index tracking, trading costs, and underlying exposure differences Picking an ETF based solely on fee differences can be a mistake. It's important to consider other factors such as how well the ETF tracks its index, trading costs, and the underlying exposure differences between similar funds.

3. Judging a book by its cover - Don't be fooled by the name of an ETF. It is fundamental to do your research and understand what the ETF actually invests in. An ETF with "emerging markets" in its name may not actually invest in the countries you're interested in.

4. Not considering economic and social instability - Economic and social instability can have a big impact on the success of an ETF that invests in a particular country or region. It is fundamental to keep these factors in mind when making investment decisions.

5. Blindly using market orders - Market orders can be risky, especially for ETFs with low trading volumes. It's better to use limit orders to ensure you get a fair price.

6. Ignoring expense ratios - Expense ratios can eat into your returns over time, so please consider them when choosing an ETF. Look for ETFs with low expense ratios to maximize your returns.

  • 7. Not understanding the fundamentals of the country the ETF is following - Understanding the fundamentals of the country the ETF is following is important, as is the creditworthiness of the currency in that country.
  • 8. Panic-selling - Emerging market ETFs can be volatile, and it's important to have a long-term investment horizon and not panic-sell during short-term market fluctuations.
  • 9. Not considering liquidity - Liquidity can be an issue for some ETFs, especially those with low trading volumes. It is fundamental to consider liquidity when choosing an ETF to ensure you can buy and sell shares when you need to.

    10. Investing in something you don't understand - It is fundamental to do your research and understand what you're investing in before putting your money into an ETF. Don't invest in something you don't understand just because you think it might be a good investment.

    Note: Please keep in mind that the estimate in this article is based on information available when it was written. It's just for informational purposes and shouldn't be taken as a promise of how much things will cost.

    Prices and fees can change because of things like market changes, changes in regional costs, inflation, and other unforeseen circumstances.

    Final analysis and implications

    So, we've talked about the best ETFs for investing in emerging markets, but let me ask you this: is investing in index funds really the best way to go about it?

    Don't get me wrong, index funds can be a great way to diversify your portfolio and gain exposure to a broad range of emerging market companies. But they're not without their drawbacks.

    For one, index funds are by definition passive investments. They simply track a particular index and don't take into account individual company performance or other market factors. This means that you're essentially investing in the entire market, good or bad.

    Additionally, index funds can be heavily weighted towards certain industries or sectors. For example, if you invest in an emerging market index fund that's heavily weighted towards technology companies, you could be missing out on other opportunities in sectors like healthcare or consumer goods.

    So, what's the alternative? One option is to invest in actively managed funds that have a more hands-on approach to investing in emerging markets. These funds are managed by professionals who actively research and select individual companies to invest in, rather than simply tracking an index.

    Of course, actively managed funds come with higher fees and the potential for underperformance, so please do your research and choose a fund with a strong track record.

    In the end, the best approach to investing in emerging markets will depend on your individual goals and risk tolerance. But it's worth considering all your options, including actively managed funds, before jumping into an index fund.

    So, as you navigate the world of emerging market investing, remember to keep an open mind and consider all your options. Who knows, you may find that the best ETF for you isn't an ETF at all.

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    Best Emerging Market ETF

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    Links and references

    1. 1. "Introducing the Global X Emerging Markets Great Consumer (EMC) and Emerging Markets (EMM) ETFs"
    2. 2. "Vanguard® FTSE Emerging Markets ETF Investment Profile"
    3. 3. "econ|columbia emerging markets consumer etf"
    4. 4. "How ETFs Amplify the Global Financial Cycle in Emerging Markets Federal Reserve Board"
    5. 5. "Fact Sheet:SPDR® MSCI Emerging Markets StrategicFactors ETF, Mar2023 SSGA"
    6. 6. "Fact Sheet:SPDR® S&P® Emerging Markets Small Cap ETF, Mar2023 SSGA"
    7. globalxetfs.com
    8. forbes.com
    9. ameriprise.com
    10. thestreet.com
    11. fidelity.com
    12. morningstar.com
    13. theglobeandmail.com
    14. nih.gov
    15. justetf.com

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